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$27.95
Sturdy clan crest kilt pin. Made in Scotland of pewter.  We consider this clasp closure one of the best on the market -- not as easy to lose from the kilt!  Select your clan or provide your name when ordering so we can determine which clain association.
$23.00
Stunning Thistle kilt pin in bronze comes gift boxed with Outlander engraved on the back.  Usually in stock but allow up to three weeks if not available.
$45.00

Beautiful kilt pin with entwined thistle and Saltire flag. Shows Scottish pride!

$59.00

A fixed-pin penannular-style plaid brooch with Lion Rampant pin top and thistle terminals. Brooches with large movable central pins were near universal as garment fasteners in the Iron Age, although the design was heartily adopted and elaborated by the peoples of Scotland and Ireland in the centuries between 700 and 900AD.

The Lion Rampant has been the symbol of the Scottish MOnarchs since at least the time of Alexander II and the 1220s. 'Rampant' is a heraldic term for a beast standing on its hind legs, with raised claws, poised ready to strike. It represents the courage, bravery and ferocity of the Scots. This brooch is intended to evoke the confidence of medieval, Renaissance and modern Scotland altogether.

Cast in 100% lead-free pewter.

$59.00

A fixed-pin penannular-style plaid brooch. The design of this brooch is inspired by the Battersea Shield, considered to be one of the finest pieces if Celtic Art to have survived from the Iron Age. Dredged from the Thames in 1857, it is assumed to date from sometime between 350 and 50BC-- before the Romans first came to Britain.

cast in 100%lead-free pewter

$69.00

The design of this brooch is meant to evoke various stands of Celtic art. This is a large brooch, 104mm long and 85mm wide- ideal for use with fly plaids, or upon a shawl.

Brooches wih large movable central pins were near universal as garment fasteners in the Iron Age. although the design was heartily adobted and elaborated by the peoples of Scotland and Ireland in the centuries between 700 and 900AD.

This plaid brooch was traditionally a decorative weight, to keep the plaid attached to the wearer, as well as to show off the status of its wearer.

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